Transition from bronze to iron

Go down

Transition from bronze to iron

Post by DIESEL on Sat Jun 13, 2009 2:22 pm

Bronze was previously used to make tools because its melting point is lower than that of iron. The Iron Age began with the development of higher temperature smelting techniques. During the Iron Age, the best tools and weapons were made from steel, an alloy consisting of iron with a carbon content between 0.02% and 1.7% by weight. Steel weapons and tools were nearly the same weight as those of bronze, but stronger. However, steel was difficult to produce with the methods available. Therefore, many Iron Age tools were fashioned of wrought iron.[8] Wrought iron is weaker than bronze, but because it was less expensive, and more easily sharpened, people used it anyway. Iron is by itself an adequately strong metal without additional alloys (although it could be further strengthened by case-hardening or forge welding small amounts of steel to areas subject to wear such as edges). Bronze, on the other hand, requires copper and tin, which are less common than iron. Additionally, iron can be sharpened by grinding whereas bronze must be reforged.

Around 1800 BC, for reasons yet unknown to archaeologists, tin became scarce in the Levant, causing a decline in bronze production. Copper, also, came to be in short supply. As a result, pirate groups around the Mediterranean, from around 1800–1700 BC onward, began to attack fortified cities in search of bronze, to remelt into weaponry.

Bronze was much more abundant in the period before the 12th to 10th century and Snodgrass suggests that a shortage of tin, as a result of the trade disruptions in the Mediterranean at this time, forced peoples to seek an alternative to bronze. That many bronze items were recycled and made from implements into weapons during this time, is evidence of this.

_________________
Live Life and enjoy Every day as if its your last.
avatar
DIESEL
Administrator
Administrator

Posts : 115
Join date : 2009-06-11
Location : Derbyshire

http://www.sportdale.com

Back to top Go down

Re: Transition from bronze to iron

Post by DIESEL on Sat Jun 13, 2009 2:23 pm

Date Crete Aegean Greece Cyprus Total Anatolia Grand total

1300–1200 BC 5 2 9 0 16 33 65
1200–1100 BC 1 2 8 26 37 N.A. 74
1100–1000 BC 13 3 31 33 80 N.A. 160
1000–900 BC 37 30 115 29 1.40 N.A. 211
Total Bronze Age 5 2 9 0 16 33 65
Total Iron Age 51 35 163 88 337 N.A. 511

_________________
Live Life and enjoy Every day as if its your last.
avatar
DIESEL
Administrator
Administrator

Posts : 115
Join date : 2009-06-11
Location : Derbyshire

http://www.sportdale.com

Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum